I have Viral Conjunctivitis... Really Sick... I am not going to prepare new test papers for the time being.


Friday, 25 January 2019

COMPOUNDING: WORD FORMATION PROCESSES (PART 3A) || HM HU201 || WBUT || MAKAUT

COMPOUNDING: WORD FORMATION PROCESSES


As I had promised in my previous write-up, I have dealt with 'Compounding' in this one. The fourth article would also be on the same topic.
If you have not read the Part 1 & 2 of the articles on Word-Formation, you can click the following links.



Let's start talking about Compounding by citing a few examples. Just tell me if you can find something common about the following words:

 a. wallpaper b. classroom c. bookcase d. cover letter e. post office f. endgame g. notebook h. breakfast i. off-white j. gel pen k. troubleshoot l. bitter-sweet m. cross examine n. loudmouth 
o. merry-go-round

I am sure you have noticed
that these words are combinations of two or more than two existing roots. For example, both the words, 'books' and 'bookcase', have 'book' in them. So, is 'books' a compound? No. Why! Well, it's because both its parts are not roots. 'Book' is a root whereas '-s' is an affix. However, 'bookcase' is a compound because both its parts, 'book' and 'case', are roots. The presence of these roots plays a significant factor in meaning-making.

So, what should you remember from the first two paragraphs? 
  • You will find at least two roots in a compound.     
Now, have a look at those examples again.


a. wallpaper b. classroom c. bookcase d. cover letter e. post office f. endgame g. notebook h. breakfast 
i. off-white j. gel pen k. troubleshoot l. bitter-sweet m. cross examine n. loudmouth o. merry-go-round 

Just tell me how these words appear to you. I know it's a strange thing to say. But, still, what's the first thing that strikes you about these words? 

I'm sure your responses will be along the following lines.

Observations: 1. The compounds are made of at least two root-words. 
                       2. There are some compounds which have their constituents written together without a space bar separating them. (CLOSED COMPOUNDS)
For example, classroom, wallpaper etc.

                       3. There are some compounds which have their constituents written separately. (OPEN COMPOUNDS)
For example, gel pen, cover letter, post office etc.
  
                      4. There are some compounds which have their constituents joined with a hyphen. (HYPHENATED COMPOUNDS)
For example, bitter-sweet, Indo-China, off-white etc.

Now, this is easy. Let's complicate things, shall we? 😃😃😃😃😃😃😃

I am absolutely sure that you can guess the meaning of several compound words by looking at the constituents. But, what about 'lazy bones' and 'loudmouth'? Can you understand the meaning of these compounds from the roots (i.e. 'lazy' & 'bone', 'loud' & 'mouth') which were used to form these words? Be honest about it? Tell me in the comment section. If you hadn't known what a merry-go-round is or looks like, would you have been able to picture it by looking at 'merry', 'go', and 'round'?
This will be our topic of discussion for the next article, COMPOUNDING: WORD FORMATION PROCESSES (PART 3B)

Until next time, this is RB, signing off.

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