I have Viral Conjunctivitis... Really Sick... I am not going to prepare new test papers for the time being.


Sunday, 21 April 2019

PROVED OR PROVEN: DIFFERENCE

PROVED OR PROVEN: DIFFERENCE

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PROVED OR PROVEN : DIFFERENCE

As a matter of fact, there is an extremely simple answer. If you look up these words (i.e. 'proved' and 'proven') in a regular book on English grammar, you would find they are the past participles of the same verb (i.e. 'prove'). However, in terms of their usage, there is a debate. Some people say that you can use them more or less interchangeably. On the other hand, the traditional English grammar prescribes that we should use 'proven' as an adjective only (and not as a past participle in a sentence),  e.g. "a proven fact", "a proven remedy". 

It implies that (as far as conservative grammarians are concerned) we would not use 'proven' in place of 'proved' in the following sentences:

I think she has proved her point.

I understand what you are saying, but you have not proved your argument.

Her statements are yet to be proved.

Having said that, the saying, 'Innocent until proven guilty' (which is a shortened version of 'One is innocent until one is proven guilty') is an exception. I guess it is because it is a fixed expression. 

In American English, 'proven' is almost always used as a past participle. However, in British English, one is more likely to see 'proved' used instead.

As far as I am concerned, I would prefer the traditional grammar to the American way in this case.

Use "proven" as an adjective.

Use "proved" as a past participle.


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