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Tuesday, 1 December 2020

50 VERBS FOLLOWED BY GERUNDS || GRAMMAR LESSONS ONLINE || ENGLISH TUTORIAL

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In my previous article, I had discussed the verbs that do not take prepositions. Do check it out! Today, I am going to talk about those verbs which can be followed by gerunds.

You know why I have highlighted the phrase, "can be followed"? I would like you to remember that there are many grammatical constructions where you will not see these verbs with gerunds.

LIST OF VERBS FOLLOWED BY GERUNDS

Admit

He finally admitted making a mistake.

Advise

I'd advise going there in person.

Anticipate

The Education Minister anticipates having several candidates for the exam.

Acknowledge

He finally acknowledged having been at fault.

Appreciate

We appreciate your making the effort to come at such short notice.

Avoid

I usually try to avoid going shopping on weekdays.

Bear

She can't bear being bored.

Begin

He began learning to speak French at the tender age of seven.

Bother

Don't bother locking the door.

Complete

She just completed painting the walls.

Consider

Have you ever considered selling your car?

Continue

If he continues drinking like that, someone will have to carry him home.

Defer

Can we defer making the payment until next month?

Delay

We should not delay deciding about the new business plans until next month.

Deny

He denies breaking her glasses.

Die

The idea was to bring together a group of remarkable people ... to fight the battles we never could. Phil Coulson died still believing in that idea.

Discuss

She discussed buying a new mobile set.

Dislike

She dislikes walking.

Enjoy

He doesn't enjoy meeting people and seeing new places.

Entail

Repairing the car will entail spending a lot of money.

Feel

I feel like slapping his face.

Finish

haven't yet finished reading that book.

Forget

I forgot locking the door.

Go

We go shopping every Sunday night.

Hate

She hates singing in front of guests.

Involve

Does this operation involve spending a lot of money?

Justify

He couldn't justify hiring his friends.

Keep

We kept hoping that she would win.

Like

He likes playing chess.

Love

She loves dancing.

Mention

My brother mentioned seeing you the other day.

Mind

Would you mind writing it down, please?

Miss

He only just missed being run over by a car yesterday.

Postpone

He had to postpone going to Spain because his wife fell sick.

Practise

I need to practise speaking French.

Prefer

I prefer playing cricket to watching it.

Quit

He quit smoking last year.

Recall

The witness recalled seeing her outside the house on that night.

Recollect

I do not recollect meeting her last week.

Recommend

I'd recommend going through this article.

Regret

Many people regret not having studied harder at school in future.

Remember

I did lock the door. I just don't remember doing it.

Resent

He resents having to explain everything to his parents.

Resist

The spectators couldn't resist laughing at the stupidity.

Risk

He risked losing his house when his company went bankrupt.

Start

They started building the dam in October.

Stop

I can't stop laughing.

Suggest

The parents suggested putting the matter to the school committee.

Tolerate

The Headmaster does not tolerate lying.

Try

You will be late for school if you don't try getting up earlier.

NOTE

Difference between 'Advice' and 'Advise'

The verb, 'advise' (/ədˈvɑɪz/), means "to give someone a piece of advice". There is a 'c' instead of an 's' in 'advice' (n.). The noun, 'advice' (/ədˈvɑɪs/), means "a suggestion about what someone should do". You might have also noticed that the words, 'advise' (v.) and 'advice' (n.), are pronounced differently.

'At short notice' or 'On short notice': Which one should you use?

'On short notice' is used in American English. Now, you tell me which one you should use.

'Not bear thinking about': Meaning and Use

It refers to a thought that is too unpleasant to think about.

For example,
What if we fail in the exam? It doesn't bear thinking about.
Remember that in American English, one "passes/fails exam(s)". The preposition, 'in', is not used there.

'Forget to do' vs. 'Forget doing'

Let's deal with the construction, 'forget + infinitive with to' with an example.

I forgot to lock the door.
It means "I was supposed to lock the door, but I didn't actually do it".

On the other hand, the construction, 'forget + (-ing)', has a different meaning.

For example,

I forgot locking the door.
It means "I did lock the door, but I don't remember doing it".

'Keep going': Meaning and Use

If things keep going like this, we'll have to change our plans.
The phrase, 'keep going', means "to continue in the same manner as before".

'Practice' and 'Practise': Difference

The noun, 'practice'(/ˈpræk.tɪs/), has a 'c' as its penultimate (second from the last) letter. However, its verb, 'practise' (/ˈpræk.tɪs/), we have an 's' there.

In American English, both the noun and the verb are spelt P-R-A-C-T-I-C-E.

'Go on to do' vs. 'Go on doing'

The phrase, 'go on to do something', means "to do something new".
After discussing the grammatical concepts, the teacher then went on to talk about the use of colloquial expressions in novels.
On the other hand, the phrase, 'go on to do something', means "to continue doing the same thing".
He went on talking for an hour.

'Regret to do' vs. 'Regret doing'

I regret to do it.
It means "I'm sorry that I have to do it".
I regret doing it.
It means "I did it and now I'm sorry about it".

QUIZ

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